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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
of six-year-old james mattioli, one of the slain first graders from sandy hook elementary school. hours later, a church bell tolled as mourners greeted another small white casket at the funeral for jessica rekos, also six. (bell tolling). meanwhile, students from other local schools returned to class. in buses adorned with ribbons bearing sandy hook's colors, police were on hand as were counselors. >> making the kids safe and happy. that's all we're here for. is to make sure that they are safe and happy. >> suarez: sandy hook itself remains closed. plans call for its students to be sent to a now vacant school in nearby monroe, but it was unclear when. back in washington, a string of democratic members of congress took to the house floor calling for new gun legislation. >> thank you, mr. speaker. we need to pass bold, necessary, overdue gun control legislation. if we do not, this will happen again. >> 20 innocents and their six teachers. more tears. more burials. but will we heed its meaning? will we break the gun lobby's spell? >> suarez: outside the capital, the head of the brady campa
year, isaac in august and recently sandy. each storm brought a grim reminder of yet one more ever-present disaster: the deadly cholera epidemic that started ten months after the quake. at the cholera ward of saint luke's hospital just outside the capital port-au-prince, this doctor says since hurricane sandy admissions have doubled from 20 to 40 patients each day. >> most of the new cases are coming from further up the hill in places where we had not seen them before. i'm not positive but perhaps the wells there have been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have drop
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)